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© 2007-9 Condo President, LLC.  No portion or derivative may be used without written consent of Condo President LLC. .
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Do you know what a needs to be done to successfully bring in a new Management Company during their first, vital 90 days on the job?  You should! 
Book Features

  • A  condensed field guide that will describe all things that you should do to successfully bring on a new Management Company during the critical first 90-days for your new association
  • A clear and concise plan of action that is founded in best practices, proven results, and does so in a manner that most effectively uses your valuable time. 
  • The time-based suggested actions provides the sequence that you should follow and prioritizes the things that you should be working on at any given point in time,
  • Over 75 pages of sample documents of all the necessary forms, templates, and instructions needed to transition new Management Company leadership into condo or homeowner association.

  • Completely flexible to customize your approach to fit your unique situation
Why Would I Need This Book?

Choosing a new or successor Management Company can be one of the most important roles for a condo or homeowner association Board of Directors.   Although everyone wishes for a smooth transition, these types of changes are often unplanned and high-risk.  The process of transitioning to a new Management Company has such tremendous ramifications that it should not be left to chance.   A well planned and executed transition plan will be applauded by the Board of Directors, association members, and the new Management Company personnel.

This book provides a “best practice” for introducing a new Management Company and/or its manager to an association.  It helps to minimize organizational and individual stress and reduce organizational "downtime" (less than optimal productivity).  This is accomplished through a series of planned activities that assess and react to the needs, demands, issues, and concerns which much be addressed during this critical first 90-day period.

If you are a new Management Company manager or the condo or homeowner association BoD who has just hired one, you need to pay attention to these issues.  You need to position yourself for success.  Finally, you need to know what to do!
How Will It Help Me?

  • It saves you time!  This book provides a clear roadmap of what to do, how to do it, and when to do it.  It will save you hours of research time and/or talking to experts trying to figure out what you should do. 

  • It saves you effort!  Ignoring this transition period or approaching it in a hap-hazard fashion, will cause problems that  will have to eventually fixed.  Done properly, it can result in significant personal and organizational efficiencies.  Done improperly, it can result in stress and turmoil for everyone involved and a period of downtime for the association.   This book allows a new Management Company manager to accelerate his/her learning curve by avoiding mistakes, finding solutions, and gaining necessary support to properly do their jobs.

  • It saves you money!  The cost of an improper transition of a new Management Company — in terms of failure rates and lost opportunities — is very high.  The "soft" costs of derailment can be incalculable. The "hard" costs aren't.  This book will help you to get the highest possible rate of return on your new Management Company investment? 

  • It saves you aggravation!  Expectations run high when a new Management Company is selected .  BoD members expect that performance will be corrected or improved.  Although everyone is counting on the new manager to be successful, it won’t just automatically happen. If it doesn't, you will have angry or disappointed members asking lots of "why" questions.

  • It makes you look good!  The new Management Company manager comes across as competent and well-qualified with a grasp of the association's issues and a solid plan for improvement.  The BoD comes across as qualified leaders who recognize the importance of a proper transition and who have set up the new Management Company (and association) for success.
This page was last updated: May 16, 2011
Creating High Performing Condo and Homeowner Associations
Table Of Contents
When a condo or homeowner association Board of Directors (BoD) decides that its Management Company is not doing the job to its satisfaction and that it should be replaced, it undergoes the painstaking process of recruiting and hiring a new one.  Many think that their job is completed once the contract has been signed.  But, in reality, it is just starting a very important phase that should not be ignored or underestimated – the transition of the new Management Company into its association.  The transition can be lengthy and complex in the best of circumstances, while worst case scenarios can involve lost documents, unpaid bills and even the disappearance of funds.  Done properly, it can result in significant personal and organizational efficiencies.  Done improperly, it can also result in stress and turmoil for everyone involved and a period of downtime for the association.
 
Too many associations leave their new Management Company in a "sink or swim" situation, once they are hired.  After all, they are getting paid all that money to know what they are doing, right?  By the same token, too many newly hired Management Companies allow an association to do that to them.  After all, they are the customer and they know what they are doing, right?  There are several consequences that can be expected with this approach for both the Management Company and the association including: 
  • The Management Company may not thoroughly understand which customer(s) they are trying to serve – the person who hired them, the BoD, or association members.  They in turn, may direct their efforts in the wrong direction or may be unduly influenced by the wrong people who have limited or skewed perceptions, or their own agendas to advance.
  • The Management Company may not know about the nature of the association, its culture, its people, its issues and its opportunities.  Although this knowledge is often gained over long periods of time, it is usually through a trial-and-error process with a high cost in terms of money and people’s time.
  • The Management Company may become isolated.  By not getting out and connecting to the people who really know what's going on and not building critical relationships with BoD members, they can be left stranded.
  • The Management Company may come in with "the answer" but it may be the wrong one.  The Management Company may come in with decisive actions and a directive tone to "fix" the association problems, often following their company standard policies and practices.  But, “the answer” may not fix the right problems.
  • The Management Company can move too quick or too slow.  Attempting to do too many things at once may confuse and overwhelming people.  Not making enough meaningful progress early on may breed dissension and discontent and plant seeds of doubt in their capability.
  • The Management Company may not manage unrealistic expectations.  Not understanding the nature of key stakeholders' expectations and carefully deflating those that are too high, while taking advantage of those that can be useful, will undoubtedly lead to performance disappointment in the eyes of the customer(s).

The cost of an improper transition of a new Management Company into a condo or homeowner association — in terms of failure rates and lost opportunities — is very high.   Whenever there is a change in a Management Company, one can expect a productivity decline in the association -- a sort of organizational "downtime" that occurs due to this transition.   It can be the result of the old Management Company leaving with its focus on wrap-up activities, the association BoD reacting with reduced involvement due to the uncertainty of the situation, or the new Management Company arriving on the scene with a lack of accurate information or important relationships with key decision-makers and leaders.  This can cause the association to temporally shut down many of its normal activities until the new Management Company gets on board and up to proper speed.

According to a survey of 200+ company CEO’s; it takes an average of 6.2 months for a typical new midlevel manager to reach their optimal level of effectiveness.  In the US Navy, this period has been estimated to be up to 6 months for a new incoming officer.  Therefore, it is not unreasonable to expect that these numbers would be similar for a new Management Company manager joining any condo or homeowner association.  Intelligently managing the transition process can significantly reduce the amount and length of this downtime to an association.  An orderly and planned transition process can cut this “downtime” to 1 to 2 months.

Transitions are pivotal times and also periods of great vulnerability.  New Management Company managers who fail to build momentum during their transitions face uphill battles from that point forward.  The actions taken during the first few months have a major impact on the overall success or failure of the new Management Company that is hired.  This book provides a proven method of transitioning new leaders to organizations.  It has been used by the author for over 25 years in the for-profit business environment with an excellent track record of results.  Simply put, IT WORKS!

Although many people can gain valuable insights from this book, it is specifically targeted towards a new Management Company manager and/or the BoD of any sized condo or homeowner association.  Since the transition is vital to the success of both, either party can take the lead in implementing the principles and recommended actions.  The objectives are to minimize organizational and individual stress and to reduce organizational "downtime" (less than optimal productivity).  This is accomplished through a series of planned activities that assess and react to the needs, demands, issues, and concerns which much be addressed during this critical first 90-day period.

Preface
The Preface and Table Of Contents, you should give you a feel for what this book provides and how it is organized. 
Warning and Disclaimer 4

PREFACE 5

INTRODUCTION 9

AFTER THE DECISION IS MADE TO HIRE A NEW MANAGEMENT COMPANY 14
  • Finalizing the New Management Company Contract Details 14
  • Communicate the Management Company Change to Association Members 15
  • Communicate the Management Company Change to All Current Service Providers 15
  • Write a Welcome Letter to the New Management Company 16
  • Update Association Information with Governmental Agencies 16
  • Update Association Information with Financial Institutions 16
  • Manage the Exit of the Old Management Company 17
  • Understand How You Want to Use a Management Company 26

PRIOR TO ENTERING THE NEW POSITION 27
  • Prepare For the Job – Before You Start the Job 27
  • Learn As Much As You Can About the Association 28
  • Contact the Former Management Company Manager 29
  • Take Charge Of The Leadership Role 30

THE FIRST DAY ON THE JOB 33
  • Hold a “Supervisor” Orientation Meeting 33
  • Introduce Yourself to any Staff or Other Team Members 35
  • Conduct an Administration Orientation 36

WITHIN THE FIRST TWO WEEKS ON THE JOB 39
  • Assure That All Essential Services and Activities Are Functioning Properly 39
  • Hold Preliminary (One-On-One) Discussions with Each of the BoD Members 39
  • Hold Preliminary (One-On-One) Discussions with Each Committee Chairperson 40
  • Be Visible and Talk To Association Members 40
  • Make Contact with Professional Service Providers 41
  • Follow-up with Requested Information from Prior Manager 42
  • Inspect the Property 43
  • Hold a New Manager Welcome Gathering 43
  • Determine How the Organization Works 43
  • Begin To Settle In On a Few Major Priorities 44

WITHIN THE FIRST MONTH ON THE JOB 46
  • Conduct a Leadership Transition Meeting With Key Association Members 46
  • Formalize Your Plans with Your Supervisor and/or BoD 48
  • Secure Some Early Wins 49
  • Become Engaged Early and Often 50

WITHIN 1-3 MONTHS ON THE JOB 51
  • Lay the Foundation for Major Improvements 51
  • Develop Your Personal Strategic Plan 51
  • Develop a Shared Vision 52
  • Review Progress with Your Supervisor and/or BoD 53
  • Celebrate 53

SUMMARY 54

Appendix A – Sample Design for a Leadership Transition Meeting 55
Appendix B – Typical Manager Responses to Leadership Transition Meeting Questions 62
Appendix C – Facilitator Leadership Transition Meeting Introduction Material 65
Appendix D – Typical Group Responses to Leadership Transition Meeting Questions/Answers 70

ABOUT THE AUTHOR 73

INDEX 74

Terms & Conditions of Use Agreement 75