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Successful condo or homeowner associations do not just happen – and they do not just stay successful. Good associations are made up of individually successful people who do the right things at the right time in the right circumstances. Good association Board of Director leaders can become even better ones though the proper use of experiences, relationships, education, and training. 

The material contained in this website is devoted to that end.  It presents informative articles, proven best practices, and “how to” books  that are targeted towards helping association Board members be the very best they can.

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This page was last updated: May 16, 2011
Do you know what a needs to be done to successfully bring in a new Management Company during their first, vital 90 days on the job?  You should!
Available  Books (Click on picture below for further information)

Should I cut off my left hand (reduce services and amenities) or cut off my right hand (increase fees)?  The ideal solution is to do neither by eliminating unnecessary costs and waste.  But, how do I go about doing that?
CONTENTS
Click above to see a list of all the things that a new or existing condo/homeowner association Board should consider for setting up the necessary management and control infrastructure.
Creating High Performing Condo and Homeowner Associations
Now that I am the president of a condo or homeowner association, what exactly do I do?
Here are 5 vignettes that deal with condo/HOA Management Company topics that every board member will recognize.  Provocative, often controversial, the book targets familiar conflicts and fallacies of selecting, retaining, improving, dismissing a Management Company -- or even whether to use one in the first place.
Here are 6 vignettes that deal with topics relating to day-to-day situations that every condo/HOA board member will recognize.  Provocative, often controversial, the book targets familiar conflicts and fallacies of leadership and managerial life for associations. It emphasizes how board members can create successful associations by doing the right things at the right time in the right circumstances, and more.
Decision Making is often the silent killer of a condo or homeowner association if its quality is not monitored and upheld.  At the same time it can be its lifeblood if it is developed, monitored and managed properly. The good news is that this is a skill that can be learned and improved.